We are delighted to announce that the Handbook of Computational Social Choice has now been published with Cambridge University Press.

handbook_cscDescription: The rapidly growing field of computational social choice, at the intersection of computer science and economics, deals with the computational aspects of collective decision making. This handbook, written by thirty-six prominent members of the computational social choice community, covers the field comprehensively. Chapters devoted to each of the field’s major themes offer detailed introductions. Topics include voting theory (such as the computational complexity of winner determination and manipulation in elections), fair allocation (such as algorithms for dividing divisible and indivisible goods), coalition formation (such as matching and hedonic games), and many more. Graduate students, researchers, and professionals in computer science, economics, mathematics, political science, and philosophy will benefit from this accessible and self-contained book.

A PDF of the book is freely available on the Cambridge University Press website. Click on the Resources tab, then on “Resources” under “General Resources”, and you will find a link called “Online Version”. The password is cam1CSC.

Alternatively, the book can be purchased through Cambridge University Press, Amazon, and other retailers.

We hope that the book will become a valuable resource for the computational social choice community, and the CS-econ community at large.

Best regards,
Felix Brandt, Vince Conitzer, Ulle Endriss, Jerome Lang, and Ariel Procaccia (the editors)

Continuing the tradition from last year, there will be an article in the June edition of the SIGecom Exchanges profiling 2017 junior job market candidates from the SIGecom community. These profiles will include the thesis title, research summary, brief biography, and citations to three representative papers. At least one of these papers should have appeared in the ACM Conference on Economics and Computation (EC) or a comparable venue. To be considered, submissions must be initiated by May 15 and finalized by May 22. Further instructions for submissions can be found on the submission form. The article will be coedited by Hu Fu and Vasilis Gkatzelis.

The 11th Workshop on the Economics of Networks, Systems and Computation (NetEcon 2016) will be held on June 14, 2016, in conjunction with ACM SIGMETRICS 2016, in Juan-les-Pins, France. Deadline for paper submission is Friday April 1, 2016. The CFP can be found here.

The 25rd International World Wide Web Conference (WWW 2016) will be held from April 11 to 15, 2016 in Montreal.  Among its many tracks is the Economics and Markets Track.  Deadline for paper submission is October 17th (abstract due by October 10th).

The first of a series of special issues from STOC, FOCS, and SODA has been published in Games and Economic Behavior; it contains papers invited from the 2011 conferences. The papers in the issue cover topics including mechanism design, the price of anarchy, networks, and learning in games. As the introduction to the special issue [pdf] concludes, “2011 was an outstanding year for algorithmic game theory.”

A very big thank you to guest editors Shuchi Chawla and Lisa Fleischer!

From Rakesh Vohra:

The Prize in Game Theory and Computer Science of the Game Theory Society in Honour of Ehud Kalai was established in 2008 by a donation from Yoav Shoham in recognition of Ehud Kalai’s role in promoting the connection of the two research areas.

The Prize will be awarded at the Fifth World Congress of the Society, July 24 – 28, 2016, Maastricht, The Netherlands. The Prize will be awarded to the person (or persons) who have published the best paper at the interface of game theory and computer science in the last decade. Preference will be given to candidates of age 45 or less at the time of the award, but this is not an absolute constraint. The amount of the Prize will be USD 2,500 plus travel expenses of up to USD 2,500 to attend the Congress.

The Game Theory Society invites nominations for the Prize. Each nomination should include a full copy of the paper (in pdf format) plus an extended abstract, not exceeding two pages, that explains the nature and importance of the contribution. Nominations should be emailed to the Society’s Secretary-Treasurer, Jean-Jacques Herings (at gts-sbe@maastrichtuniversity.nl) by September 30, 2015. The selection will be made by a committee appointed by the President consisting of

Preston McAfee (Microsoft)
David Parkes (Harvard)
Eva Tardos (chair, Cornell)
Bernhard von Stengel (LSE)

The summer edition of SIGecom Exchanges has a new feature: an article profiling the CS-Econ 2016 junior job market candidates (cf. the call for profiles). The goal of this article is to (a) reduce the information inefficiency of the market and (b) present the candidates as a cohesive community. For best results, use the keyword index at the end of the article. The most obvious statistic to report: There are 30 job market candidates for 2016! Many thanks are due to Vasilis Gkatzelis for his efforts in making this happen.

Wordle created from candidate provided keywords.